Hi everyone.  I love the fact that we live all over the globe and meet here to discuss our love of needlelace.  It got me to wondering, what is Lace Making like in your country?  It seems like here in the US, you can take up any kind of lace that you want to make.  There are conventions and lace events throughout the country.  And unless I have missed it, there is no one spot in the US where only a certain type of lace is made.  Is this true for your country?  Please share.

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And for classes:

Can you expect to find a teacher whom you can meet face to face?

Are there local government sponsored locations where classes are available?

Are there actual lace schools?

Are there local lace groups that you can join and meet with periodically?

How did you get interested in learning needlelace?  What stimulated the interest?

How long did it take to find information once you decided to try it?

Basically, we are interesting in understanding how the experience of lace making differs, or is the same, from one country to another.  Just an interesting exploration.

The Aussie system of a Guild is very good for such a large land mass. We have a central "National Committee", and we pay them our membership fees. this then gives us full rights anywhere in Australia, and the quarterly magazine, -  but we especially get our own State newsletter as well.  I think it is about the only place where you only have to join one guild and you can move Interstate, etc or just visit, and you are still a member.  Most other places - USA and south africa etc have lots of smaller guilds, and joining up here and there can be very expensive.

The National committee moves every 3 years from State to State, so the burden is spread around the country, and new and different ideas filter in.   It works well.

In the Netherlands, there are lacemaking groups and events, but they're being heavily dominated by bobbin lace. And it seems to me the lacemakers are mostly doing modern stuff. When I was looking for info on needlelace, dutch lacemaking was not the source that I needed.

In my country, Croatia, there are the three most popular needle lace. The first is the  Pag Lace, the second is Lepoglava lace and finally the Hvar lace from agava. The most popular is the Pag lace, and government has established school of that lace at Pag, that is every year from 1.9.-30.6.20-- and is placed at High School. The class is free for every citizen of Croatia. The classes are held three time a week for three hours. Unfortunately I live 200 kilometres from Pag so cant use this wonderful opportunity.

The Lepoglava bobbin lace is more popular at north field of my country. They also have free classes at Lepoglava city.

The Hvar lace is not available to learn, cause sisters makes at monastery, they are very closed community, and dont teach others, you  can only see their works.

My grandmother made national costume, where I was a kid, so I learnt knitting, sewing, and crochet as a child. Many years later I have interested for punto croce, toledo and finally needle lace work. When I sew the Pag lace, I knew that is one I want to learn and steel I have same enthusiasm. I have learnt for five years, but dont have time enough, so I try spend one-two weeks every year at Pag island and all day just work needlelace.

I'm from Argentina, but grew up in the USA so, I was introduced to needle lace from library books. I recently moved back to Argentina, I haven't been able to find any guilds or current magazines devoted to it, (I have found old Anna Burda magazines at second hand book shops though) everyone here seems to want to do easier things like broomstick crochet and knitting.

 

There are however, traditional laces, such as Randa which seems related to netting and Armenian lace, there is also Nanduti, which is more commonly known as Teneriffe. I was tought Randa by an old grandma that is my neighbor, and netting from my grandpa, who loves to fish lol. Sadly I haven't found any one else in my area, that knows about european needle lace such as reticella and etc. :/

Whenever  I have more time, I definitely want to do more with Teneriffe.  I'm glad that this site is here for you when there is not a lot where you are.  And I agree, most people I know knit and not lace.

For Needle lace here in New Zealand absolutely nothing, Bobbin lace there is a group in Christchurch and a couple in Auckland. There are very few people where i live into Bobbin lace but as far as Needle lace I am as sure as eggs that I am the ONLY person!



Mary Verhaar said:

In the Netherlands, there are lacemaking groups and events, but they're being heavily dominated by bobbin lace. And it seems to me the lacemakers are mostly doing modern stuff. When I was looking for info on needlelace, dutch lacemaking was not the source that I needed.

Hallo Mary,

Weet je dat er cursussen naaldkant georganiseerd worden in Nieuwegein? De cursussen zijn nu weer gestart, maar volgend jaar september starten er nieuwe cursussen. ze worden op zaterdag gehouden.

Annetta said:


Mary Verhaar said:

In the Netherlands, there are lacemaking groups and events, but they're being heavily dominated by bobbin lace. And it seems to me the lacemakers are mostly doing modern stuff. When I was looking for info on needlelace, dutch lacemaking was not the source that I needed.

hello Linda,

In the Netherlands is a an organisation, named LOKK.(landelijke organisatie voor kantkunst) It is an association about lace-arts, lacemakers, bobbin and needlelace. Here are also a kind of bees (like quiltingbees), sometimes the members come together by one member at home, sometimes in a certain location.
Just as Mary said there are most bobbinlace makers, but needlelace is there too.
I follow bobbinlace lessons in my neighborhood.At this moment I am learning how to make tulle-lace.
The teacher knows a lot about all laces, I think mostly about bobbinlace.
There are a lot of teachers, but often not in your neighborhood,so it will cost a lot of time to go to them. The Netherlands are not so big, but when you need some hours to come I don't do so.
If you like to know more, then please ask.

LOKK has a marvelous website with lots of free patterns in many different kinds of bobbin lace.   http://www.lokk.nl/gratispatronen/gratis_patroon.php

As to where I live ??? In my country Embroidery has many many varieties But no lace at all .. Or lf its their no enough information of it is available..although there are small self help groups who do the lace fro exporting.. even then they were taught by the Missionaries during British rule.. hence not native kinda lace..

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