Stitches of Alencon

Let us collect diagrams of the stitches used in Alencon, and how they are used. Preferably your own drawing. (It would be good for all of us to develop more skill in making diagrams.)

Here are 2 ground stitches. Post others in comments below.

Loretta's diagrams for horsehair picots.   

Loretta's instructions for Brides Bouclées  a one page pdf file.

Loretta's photos of her bee in process, with how the ground is worked.

http://needlelacetalk.ning.com/photo/alencon-bee-2015-hex-set/next?context=latest 

http://needlelacetalk.ning.com/photo/alencon-bee-2015-hex-set?context=latest

Loretta's experiments with different thread sizes and grid sizes.

From Brigitte Delesques-Depalle "La dentelle à l'aiguille". Basic stitch for the Alençon reseau

Veronica'a link to youtube video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M8tNgeG3FPA&app=desktop

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Comment by Verónica Castro on March 14, 2019 at 9:01am

Lorelei, thanks very much for your prompt answer! Here is the link to the video I mentioned in my latest comment, at about 06:12 you will hear the lady speaking there says: 'Il y a cinq variétés de remplis qui permettent d'ombrer le decor...' , if I have understood well, I'm not sure about it, as my French is not very good... In case I am right, it would mean 'there are five remplis types which allow for shading the decorations...', and my main question is, which are those five remplis types? 

Video link

Comment by Lorelei Halley on March 14, 2019 at 12:34am

'Veronica

Please give us the exact link to this video that you mentioned.

'Le savoir-faire de la dentelle au point d'Alençon',      I have used Laceforstudy, myself, and I find it useful. I do want to look at the video you mentioned. But I have not tried Alencon.

Comment by Verónica Castro on March 13, 2019 at 12:13pm

I have been making some visual research about Alençon remplis stitches. First, by watching the video named 'Le savoir-faire de la dentelle au point d'Alençon', I found out that they say there that there are five different ways of making the remplis, if I am not wrong (my French knowledge is not very good, so please correct me if I am). So I decided to look by myself in pics of the website 'Lace for study', and I found there this picture (link below) where there is a corded, twisted buttonhole stitch made in such a way that the returning thread does not go through the stitches in the previous row. It's in three of the five petals of the flower in the center: The side and center petals (see link below). I also have found some few cases where the remplis seems to have been weaved as a plain cloth. So I was wondering if anyone here could please explain to me which are those five types of remplis mentioned in the video, and if these ones I have found are among them or not?... Thanks very much in advance! I am just starting to learn about Alençon lace stitches, and I don't have the possibility of buying some books nor taking classes now, so any information would be of much help.

Link to picture:

Picture here

Comment by Christiane Machabée on March 29, 2015 at 11:20am

Liz,

J'ai eu l'occasion d'expérimenter la "bride tortillée" de forme hexagonale (présentée comme une variété de point dans le groupe Alençon) lors de mon premier travail en Alençon et je dois dire que je préfère énormément la façon présentée par Loretta. Je ne la remercierai jamais assez car l'image qu'elle nous a présentée est vraiment un bijou rare.

I had the opportunity to experience the "bride tortillée" hexagonal (already presented as a variety of stitch in Alençon group) at my first job in Alençon and I must say I prefer how enormously the one presented by Loretta. I can not thank her enough for the image she has presented to us because a rare gem.

Comment by Christiane Machabée on March 23, 2015 at 7:47am

Loretta,

Cette image me semble correspondre au travail de réseau exécuté autour de votre abeille. Tortillées est un mot français signifiant "twisted" en anglais, tandis que brides signifie "bars".

This image seems to match the background reseau around your bee.  Tortillées is a French word meaning "twisted" in English, while brides means "bars".

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