So, I've read in many places now that you should pull the needle away from you to create stitches, and not toward you.  Something about the stitches being more even that way?  

The video I learned from, however, does not do this.  Also, the diagrams of stitches that I've found in books make it look like you're pulling the needle toward you.  

Which way is better?

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Good morning.    When I first learnt needlelace many years ago I was taught that the needle was worked towards you.   However the continental way is for the needle to be worked away from you and many people teach that way.    I have worked both ways as I have taught needlelace and don't really have a preference.  But whichever way you work, stick with it so that you perfect it.    It is important to be comfortable as to how you work and as long as the stitches are even then that is what matters.   However, a word of warning,  sometimes the twisted stitches can be easier and more even when working with the needle away from you.  And I agree, most of the books are shown with the needle being worked towards you, in which case, just turn the book around.  What do others think?     

Yeah, I thought it was interesting that my DMC book says almost in the first two paragraphs I think that it's supposed to be worked away from you, and then the diagrams are showing quite the opposite.  I was confuzzled.  

I haven't tried any of the twisted stitches yet, so I will keep that in mind.  I'm working on a bookmark sampler so I think i'll give it a go on my next square and see how it is.

I agree with Maureen. I don't think one way is wrong and the other right. It is just a matter of who taught you. It appears to me that in England and the U.S. most embroiderers and lace makers work needle point towards you, and most European continental workers do it needle pointing away. I have heard it said that with those styles with a twisted stitch ground, like point de gaze, it is easier to work needle away because you are supposed to alternate rows with 2 twists and rows with 3 twists. And this is supposed to be more natural if you work needle away. I  haven't tried it yet, so I can't speak from experience.

I think it is like bobbin lace, where English lacemakers put the footside on the right, and continental lacemakers usually put it on the left.

I have also seen discussions of how to hold a crochet hook. My grandmother just held it in her fist, and worked very fast. (She was from Croatis.) I did it her way. But I was told once that a complicated way of holding the hook was the only right way. But the woman show showed me took twice as long as it took me to work a row.

I agree with Maureen -- do what works and is comfortable, and whichever method helps you make consistent neat stitches.

Yeah, there are a few ways to hold a crochet hook.  I've tried the weird pencil method and i can hardly even make a stitch.  I use the 'scissor' method and it seems to work well enough for me =P

Well, I'm glad I'm not setting myself up for failure then.  I'm learning from youtube videos and random online tutorials so I don't exactly have someone teaching so much as many someones.  I'm sure I'll figure it out.  

Catherine Barley works needle away, and has tried (with only a little success!!) to convert me!  However, I can only work Pt. de Gaze Ground, and other similar twisted stitch grounds with the needle Away!  Maybe this is partly due to the fact I work Knotted lace, - and that is Needle Away, and a sort of twisted stitch!

Most of my needlelace, though, is worked needle Towards me.

I say do it whichever way you are most comfortable with.  Making the lace - nicely!! - is more important that how you hold the needle -- in my opinion!

I would recommend Rochelle Sutherland's video here on our site. I found it very useful in how to hold my hands and the lace as I worked.  http://needlelacetalk.ning.com/video/make-needle-lace-mvi3937 

Also Michael Dennis' videos (Guild of Needle Laces) are also quite good.

http://needlelacetalk.ning.com/group/beginners/page/patterns-and-tu...

Michael Dennis' videos were actually what I did for my first piece of lace =)  I'm doing a bookmark now, though I'm picking and choosing the stitches.  I have this DMC needlework book and it has a bunch of stitches, some of them quite pretty. 

I just started hand sewing together a pillow to work on so hopefully I'll have more to post in the next few weeks.  I have a crochet amigurumi to make for someone first though.  So many projects, so little time! 

Lorelei Halley said:

I would recommend Rochelle Sutherland's video here on our site. I found it very useful in how to hold my hands and the lace as I worked.  http://needlelacetalk.ning.com/video/make-needle-lace-mvi3937 

Also Michael Dennis' videos (Guild of Needle Laces) are also quite good.

http://needlelacetalk.ning.com/group/beginners/page/patterns-and-tu...

crochet amigurumi

What is that?  (Maybe I know it under a different name!)

I made myself a needle lace pillow out of an old coffee tine, covered with layers of wool, and a dark cotton covering. I rarely use it, as I prefer to hold my work in my hand.  I curl up over the pillow too much, where as if I hold it in my hand I sit up a bit straighter.  It is what you get used to, really, - whatever works for you!  Making the lace is the important part, - not how you hold the work, the needle, etc!!

(I'm going "Radical" again!!)

Leslie

There are some online sources for needle lace stitches.  Look at this page, the section under the group icon.

http://needlelacetalk.ning.com/group/stitches 

amigurumi are what crochet stuffed animals are generally called.  It's a Japanese term that has just kind of stuck.  

I raided my father's basement.  I got some pvc pipe and then some batting type foam stuff from Joann's fabric.  Perfect week for it too as it's all 40% off.  I've got the foam stuff hand sewn around the pvc, and I've got the covering hand sewn on two edges.  I just need to sew the edges where the rope will be to pull it tight and maybe a bit of velcro on the long edge so it sits snug and I'll be done =)  I was too lazy to drag the sewing machine out and find a place to set it up so I just decided to backstitch the edges of the random fabric I had in my stash.  

I hope that with the pillow I can sit back on the couch or in bed and prop it up on my knees.  We'll see.  Push comes to shove I'll have it for when I try bobbin lace =P

Elizabeth Ligeti said:

crochet amigurumi

What is that?  (Maybe I know it under a different name!)

I made myself a needle lace pillow out of an old coffee tine, covered with layers of wool, and a dark cotton covering. I rarely use it, as I prefer to hold my work in my hand.  I curl up over the pillow too much, where as if I hold it in my hand I sit up a bit straighter.  It is what you get used to, really, - whatever works for you!  Making the lace is the important part, - not how you hold the work, the needle, etc!!

(I'm going "Radical" again!!)

Thanks, I did take a look at those.  I'd love to order the booklets from the guild but as I have no money right now that will have to wait.  I've favourited some of the other stitches though, I think they'll come in handy =)

Lorelei Halley said:

Leslie

There are some online sources for needle lace stitches.  Look at this page, the section under the group icon.

http://needlelacetalk.ning.com/group/stitches 

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