Needlelace tutorial -- a simple leaf.  In the text, all words in large type are links to photos, diagrams or websites.

SUPPLIES

Medium size sharp needle and ordinary sewing thread for couching.

Thimble (for couching)

Tapestry needles (or other blunt pointed needles) for the actual lace work.  Have sizes 20-26 on hand and you will always have something that will fit your chosen thread.

2 pieces cloth about 6 x 8 inches (15 x 20 cm) for temporary backing.

Plastic film to stick over the pattern.

Print the pattern on colored paper if you plan to use white or ecru thread.

THREADS AND PATTERN SIZES

Large size:  I printed Lenore's leaf 10 enlarged to 170% of its original size so it is approximately 6.75 inches or 17 cm wide.  For this size I used pearl 5 as the outline thread and crochet cotton size 30 ecru, pearl 12 dark ecru, and Egyptian cotton 24/3 as the lace threads. You will need a cordonnet thread about 6 feet long (2 meters), folded at about 1/3 of its length.

Small size: If you prefer to work on a fine scale, print the pattern at the original size.  I think DMC crochet cotton #20 or #30 would work as outline thread and tatting cotton as the lace thread.

LAYING THE CORDONNET/OUTLINE

For the enlarged pattern I used, I cut a length about 6 feet long, and folded it at about 1/3 of its length.  The long side will be the inner thread of the pair, the short side will be the outer of the 2 threads.  Print a copy of the map, leaf 10a for reference.

Place the fold at the bottom of the stem and place couching stitches, spaced about 2mm apart, up to the tip of the leaf.   You can use  leaf10adiag.   In the diagram I changed colors when the threads took on separate paths, so it would be easy to see which thread did what.  But the cordonnet is one continuous thread, folded.  Below are photos showing the stages of laying the cordonnet. Map.

1. Start at the bottom of the stem - a - and follow the path a-b-c-d-e-f-g.  At g, take the inner thread to the central vein and hook it around the central vein at e.  Then take it back through the couching stitches towards g, where it rejoins its mate.

2. The junctions at d and c are made similarly.  Follow the diagram for the junction at b.  Then make junctions at c and d from the other side.  Here is a photo of all the junctions onto the central vein.

3. The last 2 junctions from j to e and from j to f to e are a little odd.  I did them that way to avoide creating a bulky lump at the leaf tip where it would be too visible.    See this diagram

For j to e take the inner thread to e and hook it onto the center vein, then take it back the way it came and drop it.

For j to f take the outer thread to f, hook it onto the central vein, take it back down to j.  

Then take it to e and slip it between the pair of central vein threads.     I then laid it between those threads toward f. You can now cut the two tails, leaving about an inch or a little more.

 

Photos and diagrams for this pattern are all in this album.  

 

Part 2 will cover  the fillings and working the cordonnette (buttonholing the outline threads).

 

 

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Replies to This Discussion

This tutorial/workshop will remain up permanently, although I may revise it from time to time.  Any member can jump in at any time.  Post any photos, questions or comments about laying the cordonnet here. 

*just passing on my neighbor's question*

How to lay cordonnet for a Rose, which has many petals ?

Here is one of the links from our BEGINNERS group http://lacemaking-needlelacer.blogspot.com/  She has a flower design with a diagram for how to lay the cordonnet.  Her instructions are quite good.

I find the best way is to take a good look at the design, and usually, with a flower like this, I start in the centre at the bottom of a petal edge line, work around the centre, and then go up the petal line and then go around the outside, linking in to the centre each petal line, by taking one thread and linking it to the centre circle, and back up to meet the other thread.

You need to have somewhere to link into, so laying the centre circle is the obvious starting point, -- because -  if you start at the outside, you have nowhere to link the petal lines in to.

When deciding where to start - see where the lines will give you an anchor point - where they can link, - and then get that anchor point set in first.

I hope this helps to explain it.  Sorry you can't see my hands waving around to explain it!!!!!!!! :)

I always then roughly measure, by laying a thread around the lines, how much I need to complete the outline, then I add a few inches (in case I have missed a bit!), and then double the thread, and cut it off the ball.  Then the couching first stitch Must Always go though that loop/fold to anchor it down.

Thank you ma'am :)

Lorelei Halley said:

Here is one of the links from our BEGINNERS group http://lacemaking-needlelacer.blogspot.com/  She has a flower design with a diagram for how to lay the cordonnet.  Her instructions are quite good.

You have done a very good job ma'am I can visualize your hands waving :D thank you ma'am..

Elizabeth Ligeti said:

I find the best way is to take a good look at the design, and usually, with a flower like this, I start in the centre at the bottom of a petal edge line, work around the centre, and then go up the petal line and then go around the outside, linking in to the centre each petal line, by taking one thread and linking it to the centre circle, and back up to meet the other thread.

You need to have somewhere to link into, so laying the centre circle is the obvious starting point, -- because -  if you start at the outside, you have nowhere to link the petal lines in to.

When deciding where to start - see where the lines will give you an anchor point - where they can link, - and then get that anchor point set in first.

I hope this helps to explain it.  Sorry you can't see my hands waving around to explain it!!!!!!!! :)

I always then roughly measure, by laying a thread around the lines, how much I need to complete the outline, then I add a few inches (in case I have missed a bit!), and then double the thread, and cut it off the ball.  Then the couching first stitch Must Always go though that loop/fold to anchor it down.

*again my neighbor's question her name is Champa, she is nearing 50, is an embroiderer for 20 years , but is illiterate so am helping out *

how to do a needle lace rose traditional way?? any day to day thing like leaf/flower/animal shapes can be used as a design ?

*dunno what she means by it... may be the traditional rose design and / or a 3D rose just like Catherine Barley's mirror back design may be like this as Beth uploaded*

Point de gaze rose (1), with raised petals

The person who made this used several different ways of filling the spaces. Some rows follow the contour of the petal, some go more-or-less straight across.

Yeah I noticed that too.. so it's not another layer separately done and added on top ??

Lorelei Halley said:

The person who made this used several different ways of filling the spaces. Some rows follow the contour of the petal, some go more-or-less straight across.

Lorelei,

Threads & Pattern size - You say the large size printed off at 6.75 inches or 17cm wide - that sounds Huge, - do you mean the length of the leaf, rather than the width?

For the large size I measured from the pointy tip of the leaf to the base of the stem, = 6.75 inches or 17 cm. I meant width as the photograph lies.  



Lorelei Halley said:
This tutorial/workshop will remain up permanently, although I may revise it from time to time.  Any member can jump in at any time.  Post any photos, questions or comments about laying the cordonnet here. 

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