I am learning the Armenian Needlelace (janyak), using the Dickson, Kasparian, and Tashjian books.   I am half Armenian, and my mother's mother made exquisitely beautiful doilies and edgings.  My mother never learned the craft, so I had to learn it from the books.  My Grandma died before I was born, so I wanted to learn this craft to "keep it in the family".   I am also a member of the Society for Creative Anachronism (SCA), in which we recreate the life, crafts, fighting techniques, cooking, etc of people before the year 1600 a.d. (you know, that medieval/renaissance group who likes to wear armor and/or the "garb", and teach others what we've learned...  Living the "dream" - medieval life the way it should have been - without the plague, and with porto-potties.)   I have made a few lace pieces for competitions, and have taught a few beginning classes.  I want to actually sit down with another janyak maker, but all the Armenians I know in my neck of the woods do not know how to make this kind of Lace.   Are there any on you who live in the Rocky Mountain area who would like to get together for a janyak/ oya retreat, etc?   I feel all alone in my craft here...

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Get in touch with the Rocky Mountain Lace Guild.

I don't think anyone there does this sort of lace, but at least they will appreciate your work, and you will have some lacemakers to talk to.  I live in australia, but I am a member of that Guild (through a family connection!), and I know them all quite well, having visited them on various occasions.  A lovely group of people who will give you a warm welcome.

I know they are planning a lace Retreat soon, and they will be making a variety of different laces so you will fit in well!!!

 

Oh I wish I lived nearer to you, I would join you.  Start teaching anyone around you how to do it.  I will probably volunteer for doing a program on it for our fiber guild later this year when I get a bit more experience under my belt with the lace.  Several people have expressed interest in it. 

Kristine

An interesting story about your family history with needle lace.  I started needlelacetalk precisely because information and help about needle lace is so rare in the general population.  There may be a dozen or 2 people in the U.S. who make this type of lace, but I very much doubt there is 1 per state.  Post photos of your practice pieces, experiments and samplers here in the OYA group.  And then those of our members who have been working at learning this method can give help and suggestions when you get stuck.  You can also get an idea of who the OYA makers are by going to the opening page of that group.  All the members of that group are represented by little icons.   Click on the words VIEW ALL, underneath the icons, and you will get the full list.

I learned from an Elena Dickson book.later on I managed to get into a workshop with her (2012 IOLI convention. Portland OR)

4 afternoons Very well spent!!  She tidied up a couple of things for me - my knots were not tight enough, and a couple of other things I was not sure of.  If you ever get the chance to go to a workshop with her, - Grab the opportunity with Both hands!!! :)

This is such a pretty lace, and So portable - I have my ongoing large mat and thread, spare needles and scissors all in a small dilly bag that will, (Just) fit in a large pocket!  I have a dark cloth with the lace pinned onto it, by the needle, and the pattern tucked in there too.  I was advised to have a dark cloth to spread across my knees when usiing white thread, so I could see it better.  In the class I went to, there were nice white paper cloths on the tables - and white thread against white cloths  was almost impossible to see.  Luckily I was doing a bobbin lace class in the mornings, so pinched one of my dark cover cloths for the afternoon knottedd lace class!!!  Now I keep it permanently with the knotted lace bag.

Thank you all for your kind words!   Elizabeth, I will look up info on the Rocky Mountain Lace Guild, and I LOVE your suggestion to use a dark cloth beneath my work!  My eyes are not as good as they used to be, and that is a great way to add contrast to the work at hand...  Great tip!  When I display my work, or my grandmother's work, for a presentation, the lace looks wonderful against a dark velvet background.   Also, I found out that placing a lace doily on a photocopier without the lid down (that is, with the lid open), and when you make the copy, the lace is beautifully copied.  The background of the copy turns black, and the lace "print" is white (against the black), and it is yet another way to "photograph" your lace work.  For best results, the lace should be pretty flat to get a clear photocopy.  The detail is amazing. 



Elizabeth Ligeti said:

I learned from an Elena Dickson book.later on I managed to get into a workshop with her (2012 IOLI convention. Portland OR)

4 afternoons Very well spent!!  She tidied up a couple of things for me - my knots were not tight enough, and a couple of other things I was not sure of.  If you ever get the chance to go to a workshop with her, - Grab the opportunity with Both hands!!! :)

This is such a pretty lace, and So portable - I have my ongoing large mat and thread, spare needles and scissors all in a small dilly bag that will, (Just) fit in a large pocket!  I have a dark cloth with the lace pinned onto it, by the needle, and the pattern tucked in there too.  I was advised to have a dark cloth to spread across my knees when usiing white thread, so I could see it better.  In the class I went to, there were nice white paper cloths on the tables - and white thread against white cloths  was almost impossible to see.  Luckily I was doing a bobbin lace class in the mornings, so pinched one of my dark cover cloths for the afternoon knottedd lace class!!!  Now I keep it permanently with the knotted lace bag.

The tip about having a dark cloth below your work was given to me over the internet when I started doing some Filet Lace! The same principle applies - white work of any sort needs a dark background to be more easily seen.  Anything that helps is good!!!  Use whatever needle you are most comfortable with, use whatever thickness of thread you are able to see, etc.  The size of the piece of lace will vary with the thickness of the thread, - but that may not matter. If fine thread is too hard to see or use, - use a thicker thread.  Nothing is carved in stone!!! Adapt where necessary! (I am going "Radical" again. I do that on occasions!!!!!!! :) )

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