Update on discussion of what people like to use as a base to make Teneriffe Lace

hello group members

I am new to Teneriffe Lace and am trying to find an affordable, reusable and comfortable form on which to make Teneriffe Lace. Would you be willing to offer a brief description of the forms you use for this lace? Size, material, way to fix the warp in place, and free it at the end, reusability?

For example, I have a homemade 6" wooden disc with holes drilled in concentric circles. I lace a thread over the outer edge, and then weave the warp, back and forth across the disc, into the outer edge lacing. Once done making the lace piece, I cut the outer edge lace and free the lace piece. I love this wooden loom, but would like other shapes and sizes. Plus, I couldn't make it myself, but had a lot of help. So I can't make ones for my friends, who I would like to teach. Any suggestions?

Thanks so much, 

Jess

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I make my own pillows from scrap fabric and supermarket bran. I’ve also cut up a yoga mat into several layers, laid it on top of a board and then covered it in fabric.

Here’s a tutorial for making the bran filled ones. They only cost a couple of dollars to make, and can be used for many different shapes and patterns. https://www.knitting-and.com/crafts-and-needlework/teneriffe/koppo-...
Hi Jess, I make my own from template plastic. I cut the discs to whatever shape and size I want ( 2 discs per base) then glue on some fine Pelon . Then I cover in fabric lacing it very tight at the back. I use a plain coloured cotton. The discs of plastic will need a hole in the very centre big enough to get a needle through. When the discs are ready, grab a flat button, a needle and your warp thread. Thread the warp thread through the holes in the plastic and tie it off securely to the button at the back. Having the two discs joined together let’s you put pins between them to wind your warp threads around, and the button helps with initial tension. I use a polar graph covered with contact stuck to the ‘pillow’ with double sided tape to help with pin placement. If you can’t find template plastic, ( usually in quilting supplies) try some stiff cardboard or some other kind of stiff plastic. Here in Australia ice cream comes in stiff plastic containers which are useful. When finished, the pins are easily pulled out. Good luck.

Thanks so much Sarah! You must stuff your pillow very full.  I tried using a commercial pressing ham and found that as I worked the pattern on the warp, the pins pulled out of the ham. So somehow you must get yours incredibly tight!! I'm impressed.

The yoga mat idea sounds promising. That would be quite easy to try, as I have two old yoga mats to cut up!!

Sarah Bradberry said:

I make my own pillows from scrap fabric and supermarket bran. I’ve also cut up a yoga mat into several layers, laid it on top of a board and then covered it in fabric.

Here’s a tutorial for making the bran filled ones. They only cost a couple of dollars to make, and can be used for many different shapes and patterns. https://www.knitting-and.com/crafts-and-needlework/teneriffe/koppo-...

Thanks Jenny

That sounds intriguing. I'll look for the plastic you suggest. Our ice cream boxes are usually waxed card board here where I live in Canada. Fortunately, I  found a website that will generate polar graphs on the fly, so that part should be easy!!

Jenny said:

Hi Jess, I make my own from template plastic. I cut the discs to whatever shape and size I want ( 2 discs per base) then glue on some fine Pelon . Then I cover in fabric lacing it very tight at the back. I use a plain coloured cotton. The discs of plastic will need a hole in the very centre big enough to get a needle through. When the discs are ready, grab a flat button, a needle and your warp thread. Thread the warp thread through the holes in the plastic and tie it off securely to the button at the back. Having the two discs joined together let’s you put pins between them to wind your warp threads around, and the button helps with initial tension. I use a polar graph covered with contact stuck to the ‘pillow’ with double sided tape to help with pin placement. If you can’t find template plastic, ( usually in quilting supplies) try some stiff cardboard or some other kind of stiff plastic. Here in Australia ice cream comes in stiff plastic containers which are useful. When finished, the pins are easily pulled out. Good luck.
You’re right Jess, they are stuffed very firmly. I actually had to open them up and add more after I used them the first time. You really could knock someone out with them, lol.

I learned to make Teneriffe using round plastic canvas. Something like this: 

https://www.amazon.com/Darice-10-Piece-Plastic-Canvas-3-Inch/dp/B00...

Cut through just the outer circle on the canvas between each spoke coming out of the center, then weave the warp around each spoke, sliding the thread through the notches in the canvas on each side of the spoke.

After you are done making your lace, cut the outer circle of canvas off just at the end of each spoke. Flex the canvas and remove your lace of the pointy ends of the spokes. Once it is removed, cut the remaining pointy ends of the spokes off so they are flush with the next circle in the canvas.

You can then reuse the remaining canvas for a slightly smaller piece of lace on the next smallest circle in the canvas.

The fun part about using plastic canvas (besides the fact that it is pretty cheap) is you can buy canvas in lots of fun shapes--hearts, stars, squares, crosses, etc.

And it is perfect to use for teaching a beginner class---which is how I learned to use them in the first place (IOLI convention class by Karen Bovard Sayre many years ago)

Hi Sarah

Well, I cut up one of my old yoga mats and put the stack of squares into a shallow cardboard box lid, just deep enough to allow my pins to push in fully. The real test will be once I get to the outer edge, when the most amount of tension will be on the warp threads. But It seems to be working well so far. thanks again for the suggestion. I've attached a picture of the unit.

The corners are bulky looking because I used a slightly felted wool to cover the mat pieces, and I didn't cut away any of the extra corner fabric, in case it didn't work. But if it works well, I'll mitre the corners to get rid of some bulk for the long run.

Best

Jess




Sarah Bradberry said:

I make my own pillows from scrap fabric and supermarket bran. I’ve also cut up a yoga mat into several layers, laid it on top of a board and then covered it in fabric.

Here’s a tutorial for making the bran filled ones. They only cost a couple of dollars to make, and can be used for many different shapes and patterns. https://www.knitting-and.com/crafts-and-needlework/teneriffe/koppo-...

Very interesting, ladies.

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