Inadvertently worked this stitch yesterday. Can anyone tell me please if it has an actual name for future reference. Thanks.

Views: 261

Replies to This Discussion

Teri, are you sure of the figure number?  Figures in the Encyclopedia of Needlework only go up to 890.  If you could take a picture or screenshot, too, that would help. 

Karen, am attaching photo of Fig.893, from a very old copy of the book, in fact it has no publishing date and the copy is tiny.
Attachments:

Ah!  I got it!  It's Fig 723 in my version (also without a publishing date, which I downloaded from Project Gutenberg) and 723 in the online version.  Unfortunately I don't know a name for that one. 

Thanks for looking anyway. Didn't realise there were so many versions available.
Hi. I have 2 copies of the Encyclopedia do Needlework and this filling is in both of them. One I bought in 1972 and the other 1987. I have looked in some of my books, including the Hills & Gibson Needlelace Stitches classic and contemporary and haven't yet found the stitch. It is however shown on a sampler cushion In Valerie Grimwoods Starting Needlelace but there are not any details about it. I will look in my N Lovesey books as soon as I can but it might be tomorrow now as I have a class due to start shortly. Oh and the Lace app by David and Jean Leader in conjunction with the lace guild is well worth having. It is for iPad and iPhone and has diagrams of the grounds of lots of laces including, point de gaze.

I also have not heard of any name for that specific stitch.  A lot of needlelace stitches don't have proper names. Maybe we should start referring to them as numbers from the online version Karen linked to.  There are so many stitches, and so many lace languages.

hi Lorelei My book has no publication date, very old copy of Encyclopedia of Needlework, by TH. De Dillmont. Karen confirms picture as being Fig 723 in project Gutenberg and online version. My book is approximately half the size of A5.

In my version of the encyclopaedia those pictures are  (page 558) figures  945, and 946.

I think they might be variations on the Point de Brabaçon - Hills & Gibson p 22/23.

Yes Liz I think I agree with you as fig 894 in encyclopaedia of Needlework looks to be a variation of Point de Brabacon. I have now looked in all my needlelace books and not found it. It is a pretty stitch though.


Maureen Bromley said:
Yes Liz I think I agree with you as fig 894 in encyclopaedia of Needlework looks to be a variation of Point de Brabacon. I have now looked in all my needlelace books and not found it. It is a pretty stitch though.
Morning ladies,thank you for your sleuthing. it is wonderful To be able to reference it with a
Name. It produces a pleasing wavy effect when used over a large area, Each time I look it reminds me of the sea and waves. My intention was for pea variation no 2, but due to a glitch in diagram,instructions and my ditziness, I ended up with this instead. Despite being annoyed with myself, I've managed to turn a negative experience into a positive one.

Maureen, thanks for the tip about the download, looking forward to using it.

It's nice to know that it looks good over a wide area.  Sometimes it's difficult to imagine what the effect will be on a large scale when the instructions only show a small box! 

RSS

© 2019   Created by Lorelei Halley.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service