How far apart do you make your single Brussels, and how big do you make your loops?  Should they be about the same size as for corded single Brussels?  The first section of my bookmark I made with corded single Brussels, and it looks decent, but if I'm following the diagrams and photos in Encyclopedia of Needlework, etc., the loops seem to be much bigger.  I'm using size 50 DMC Cordonnet Special for my filling thread, and I used size 20 for my cordonnet.  For reference, in the space of 1.25", I have 19 rows of corded single Brussels, and about 25 stitches across.  Should my single Brussels be about the same size?

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How far apart to make the single Brussels stitch depends on the context. If you are recreating a traditional antique style then it makes sense to copy the degree of separation typical of that kind.  If you are working your own modern design, then it is absolutely your choice. Some examples: point de gaze separates the stitches (actually corded Brussels), so daylight shows between them. -- leaf

Here are a whole bunch of point de gaze photos: http://lynxlace.com/needlelacegallery.html#point-de-gaze 

probably venetian:

Also, if you look at our PHOTOS, look for my albums. I have collected some of our members' photos into albums by style. Look for the point de gaze and for the gros point. You will see quite a difference in the density of Brussels stitch. But most people work Brussels in its corded or whiped version because it is easier to control tension.

Thanks!  It's a bit difficult to determine scale on those photos, but my corded single Brussels looks very much like that second photo.  What is the more open stitch in that photo?  Is it what Therese de Dillmont refers to as double net stitch (Fig. 721)?  I think I'll save single Brussels for later, after I get the hang of the tension and spacing a little better.

The open stitch in the last photo is one of the "knotted" buttonhole stitches. I'm not sure which. Probably the knotted double buttonhole. Here are diagrams from my website:

http://lynxlace.com/needlelacestitches.html#knotted%20buttonhole 

You are wise to save the single Brussels stitch for later. When I teach beginning needle lace, I always recommend to start with corded Brussels, then add double Brussels, pea stitch, or point de Venise. Once students get the hang of tension and thread control, then single Brussels is more successful. The goal with any of these is consistency, which is often more important for good-looking lace than actual density/spacing. 

Trinity said:

Thanks!  It's a bit difficult to determine scale on those photos, but my corded single Brussels looks very much like that second photo.  What is the more open stitch in that photo?  Is it what Therese de Dillmont refers to as double net stitch (Fig. 721)?  I think I'll save single Brussels for later, after I get the hang of the tension and spacing a little better.

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